Ken

I've spent my life and almost all my energy in education. I'm a teacher educator, currently Professor of English at Stony Brook University, SUNY. I began my career at Columbia High School in East Greenbush, NY (1988-92); was a full-time doctoral student and part-time writing & English instructor at Syracuse University (92-96). I directed the Mid-State Teacher Center in Verona, NY (96-97), and then became an assistant professor of English at Illinois State University (97-2003) before I moved to Stony Brook in August 2003. I was editor the National Council of Teachers of English's _English Journal_ (2008-2013), and served on the executive board of the English Language Arts Teacher Educators (ELATE). I'm also a strong unionist (former member of the statewide executive board of the United University Professions (NYSUT)), and I was an associate dean and then dean; thus, riding the borders of management and labor. The opinions expressed in my blog are my own and do not necessarily represent the views of Stony Brook University, NCTE, UUP, or any other group of which I am a member. Please follow me @Klind2013

Grading Student Writing Objectively: A Myth and a Trap

Many newer teachers and non-specialists believe that above all else, teachers should be objective when they grade student writing.  That is, they should grade based on fact, not bias. After all, this kind of thinking goes, isn’t it wrong to judge student work subjectively, bringing one’s own thoughts, beliefs, and perspectives to bear on student… Read More »Grading Student Writing Objectively: A Myth and a Trap

My Top 10 Early-Career Teaching Fails, and What New Teachers Can Learn From Them, Part II (6-10)

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Read Part I First. Teaching Fail #6: Being a Pedantic Hard Ass The Story: This story goes way back to when I was student teaching in East Hampton, New York in 1988. My cooperating teacher had a speech class that he asked me to take over. I used his assignment for the students, which required a speech of between… Read More »My Top 10 Early-Career Teaching Fails, and What New Teachers Can Learn From Them, Part II (6-10)

My Top 10 Early-Career Teaching Fails, and What New Teachers Can Learn From Them Part I (1-5)

Teaching Fail #1: Oversleeping During my first year of teaching high school English full-time, I had a few recurring fears. Oddly enough, one was that I would be incapacitated by a 15-25-sneeze-long sneezing fit and completely lose control of a class. This didn’t happen in my early years of teaching (although it since has, and was fine).… Read More »My Top 10 Early-Career Teaching Fails, and What New Teachers Can Learn From Them Part I (1-5)

Prepping for the NCTE Convention!

I first attended the Annual Convention of the National Council of Teachers of English in 1989, as a second year high school English teacher. It was like a nerdy dream come true! Thousands of fellow teachers passionate, good-humored, and smart about teaching English. I discovered aspects of the field I had no idea existed. I… Read More »Prepping for the NCTE Convention!

A Statement for Educators on the 2016 Presidential Election

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Below is a statement I sent on the morning after the US Presidential election to my colleagues at Stony Brook University.  Perhaps other educators might find it useful. As always, my views do not necessarily represent Stony Brook University or any of its agents or subsidiaries. Dear  Colleagues, Last night the nation spoke and elected… Read More »A Statement for Educators on the 2016 Presidential Election